An Engineer’s Guide to Cats (Plus a Brief Explanation for Missing Yesterday)

Yes, I know I missed yesterday. I went to a social gathering for Passover (here, I’ll give the English version — not that I know Hebrew anyway, yet 🙂 that went a lot later than I had expected. Not only did I miss blogging, but I also missed homework, which is arguably (ha-HA!) more important than this site. Daily posting is more difficult when my already crowded computing (and real-life) schedule becomes even more crowded with one-off events. Hopefully I can get a bunch written tomorrow so this place won’t go dead over the weekend when I’m away. On to…

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The Evolution of Dance

I didn’t have time to write a post this morning, so I’ll do it now, in the afternoon. Better late than never… Not that this one would draw major traffic anyway, no matter when it’s posted. All right, it’s the weekend. I don’t really have anything new to report — well, nothing that I find exciting, at any rate. A lot of things have happened this week, to be sure, but none of the events really caught my attention beyond the usual read-it-star-it-share-it-move-on in Google Reader (or the read-it-close-it-Like-it-keep-going in FriendFeed). So I thought I’d take advantage of this uninteresting…

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Google Docs Going Offline

I’m really late to this party. Both the Official Google Blog and the Official Google Docs Blog announced offline support coming in Google Docs this afternoon, and this is the first chance I’ve gotten to write about it. So I’ll publish a brief description (more details are of course available from Googlified, Google Operating System, and Lifehacker; strange lack of Google Blogoscoped so far) and a short commentary. Everyone has probably heard of Google Gears by now, that open-source browser extension that lets Web applications enable offline functionality. Google Reader uses it (until now the only Google service to do…

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Musical in the Food Court!

This post digresses from my usual technobabble, but it’s just too funny and creative (not to mention awesome!) to pass up. Improv Everywhere is a New York City-based group of people started in 2001. What they do is usually totally off-the-wall and almost always funny. Their blog’s tagline: “We Cause Scenes”. The mission I’m featuring today, though, was done in Los Angeles, CA. (There is now a global Improv Everywhere site on Ning as well, but this mission was performed before that was launched.) I like the idea of Improv Everywhere because I am also into improvisational performance. I don’t…

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Chris Pirillo’s Thoughts on Bad Grammar: Same As Mine

As usual, I’m going to ask you to watch the video first before reading my comments: There, all done? Good, now I can comment away! This is the kind of thing that drives me crazy, too. I don’t know if anyone notices, but I try to keep my English as perfect as I can here on my blog, in my email, on Wikipedia… The list of places where I write goes on — and in each and every location, I try to use scholarly-sounding English that won’t have me embarrassing my school, my parents, or (most importantly) myself. Chris says…

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Yuck! Proprietary USB Cables

Chris Pirillo makes a good point in this video. Before I say anything further, you should watch it: There, now that you’ve seen his ire, you can read my reasoning. Plenty of us know that proprietary anything is usually bad for the consumer. Proprietary data formats force us to use the same program (switching would be a pain — manual re-entry — because the software company didn’t make a converter or export function). Proprietary procedures mean patents, trademarks, copyrights, or whatever, and mean no two companies will necessarily do things the same way. And proprietary connectors lock in an accessory…

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IPv6 vs. IPv4: The Day The Routers Died

Most geeks these days have heard of the upcoming IPv6 standard to provide an exponential increase in the number of available Internet Protocol addresses. Regular users don’t need to worry; the geeks have probably already written compatibility into your favorite programs. For us humor-loving geeks, though, there’s a certain love of funny songs and parodies, one of which I’d like to share tonight. The song is titled “The Day The Routers Died”. You can probably guess what song this is written to (“a possibly recognizable tune”). On the very off-chance you don’t know, even after watching the video, I’ll post…

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Web 2.0: Here Comes Another Bubble

When I come across genuinely funny songs, I sometimes like to blog about them. This particular one was posted on Google Blogoscoped, and I traced it back through Reddit to YouTube. It’s quite amusing. While you watch, pay attention to the lyrics and the video; there are some fleeting visual jokes, and the lyrics are always good. And yes, I will blog about this song (obviously). Update (12/17): YouTube removed my original embed “due to a copyright claim by a third party.” A quick search brought up another copy, which I’ve used to replace the old video. Meanwhile, other versions…

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PC World Blunders "Numa Numa" Language

Everyone these days has probably heard of the famous “Numa Numa Dance” video. They probably also know the name of the song used, the band that performed it, and what language it is in. Apparently, that assumption is absolutely wrong. PC World published a “Greatest Hits of Viral Video” article yesterday, and I got a link in my email today (I am a newsletter subscriber). Smack on the third page, the now-familiar face of Gary Brolsma is contained in an embedded YouTube player, with a paragraph-length blurb stating that the song is German. Wrong! Everyone probably knows this, but I’ll…

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