Why FireFox is Blocked: The Misguided Campaign to Stop AdBlock

Image via WikipediaYesterday I the Why FireFox [sic] is Blocked campaign in my post revisiting Explorer Destroyer. I said it was a subject for another post. This is that other post. I will deconstruct some of the reasoning behind the campaign, and will point out why it is flawed. First, some background. The blocking campaign was most likely started from this long thread on AdsenseChat.com, where Danny Carlton and others presented various methods for catching AdBlock usage and redirecting them to a “Stop Thief!” page. Several rational-minded users tried to talk some sense into the Firefox-blocking fanatics, to no avail.…

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Revisited: Explorer Destroyer Opinion

A long time has passed since I wrote “” — over a year and a half — and I realize I have a slightly different opinion on the site now than I did then. While I still think it’s ridiculous to block IE, I somewhat agree with the site’s sentiment, if not its methodology. Going so far as to block Internet Explorer completely is probably a little extreme. The first option, a simple note, is probably better. Even better would be for the site owner to simply work the message into their content. I have done so with a couple…

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IE7’s Blocking of prompt()

I haven’t experienced the supposed goodness that is IE7 first-hand as of yet, but I have heard plenty about its shortcomings and annoyances. Another I just read about today is the default settings that blocks websites from using the built-in prompt() method in JavaScript. It wouldn’t be super annoying if Microsoft handled user permission intelligently, though. As it is, IE7 displays the by-now familiar Information Bar (introduced in IE6 with Windows XP’s Service Pack 2) and the user can allow “scripted windows” on the page. Unfortunately, the scripting engine simply ignores the prompt and moves on through the rest of…

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IE7 Bashed by Users and Developers Alike

I’ve definitely made my share of complaints about Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, versions 6 and 7. Apparently, I’m not the only one who doesn’t like IE. Lots of people turned out to bash various aspects of the browser and the development practices behind it in the comments on an official blog post celebrating the one-year anniversary, as it were, of the browser’s release. OK, so I knew I wasn’t the only IE hater in the world, but the turnout was so significant, PC World published an article about it. Well, Computerworld did, but you know what I mean. Posters complained about…

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WOT Upgrade: Changes, Feedback, and More

Looks like I’m . Not even published for ten minutes and that last post of mine is hereby obsolete. No matter; it’s all mostly a thought dump anyway. 😉 So, as promised, here’s my run-down of new features and changes in the latest WOT release. First, the interface has undergone a major overhaul (?). The rating bars are bigger, and now have distinctly colored rating blocks instead of a full-length gradient. I do like that; it makes ratings easier to figure out. What I don’t like is the fact that the indicator of your own current rating is about 40…

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New Version of WOT Released

WOT‘s that you say? “What’s WOT? Why should I care about a new version?” Well, you should care, and I’ll explain what WOT is right now. WOT (identified in about:config parameters as “weboftrust”) is a browser add-on (currently for Firefox only, but an Internet Explorer version is coming soon [scroll down]) that provides ratings for websites you visit. Think of it as an entirely user-driven McAfee SiteAdvisor (don’t bother asking about them, please; not worth the time because of ). Sites are rated in four categories: Trustworthiness, Vendor Reliability, Privacy, and Child Safety. I’ll cover the old and new interfaces…

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Either Make It Work or Don’t Offer It, Class.com!

Updated; see end. Time to air another pet peeve of mine, namely applications that don’t do what they’re supposed to do. I have found very few examples recently, in that I can’t remember any other examples than the one I’m about to write about. I know it’s happened before; I just can’t recall at the moment. Anyway, I’m enrolled in an English class in which we read William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, and write various reports on each act (that’s just Unit 1). To assist with that endeavor, the course’s publisher, Class.com, provides students with a (not-so; read on) slick little…

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Microsoft Drops IE ActiveX Warning

Microsoft’s next update to Internet Explorer (remember, its real name is Suckernet Exploder…) will revert to the pre-WinXP SP2 behavior for ActiveX controls. That is, there won’t be any more “Click to activate…” prompts. Controls will just work. Sounds like taking a step back forward to me. The update will be rolled into the next betas of Vista SP1 and XP SP3, though the announcement did not specify what versions of IE would be changed. I would guess 7, but I’m hoping for 6, too, since that’s what I have, and those stupid prompts are annoying me. They did say…

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Sorry, Microsoft and IE7

I owe Microsoft and IE7 an apology. Last month, when I complained that IE7 wouldn’t layer properly, that was really my fault for thinking I needed to fix something that wasn’t broken. I set different background coordinates in the IE7 stylesheet (which is now empty thanks to my testing) and messed it up myself. So ignore if you came across it, or do in the future, because it’s wrong. I guess my developers’ hate for IE kept me from trying the most obvious solution: removing the fix and seeing if it was actually broken. Sorry, Microsoft.

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IE7 Bug Reopens Debate Over Protocol Handlers

A bug in IE7 affecting how the browser handles URIs that launch external programs, patched today, has rekindled discussions about the responsibilities of protocol handlers. While some say the browser developers should be held responsible, others say it is a Windows problem. From what I have read about the issue, dozens of programs are potentially vulnerable. The vulnerability is reportedly in the way Windows handles the launching of programs, not in Internet Explorer or Firefox (both of which were affected by the earlier QuickTime protocol bug). I would say that the responsibility of fixing the problem falls on Microsoft in…

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