New: Graph by Week and Month in Google Analytics

This is an exciting one! Google Analytics has just gotten the ability to change graphs to display points by week or month instead of just by day. Google Operating System reports that there is also an hourly option, which is only available on select reports such as Visitors. The Google Analytics Blog has a neat series of screenshots that displays the difference between the different views. They say the new graphing features are designed to help expose hidden trends in the data; the day view can get awfully crowded with points and short-term trends can be hard to see. I…

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Financial Reports Waste Paper; Use the Internet

Financial reports are a colossal waste of paper. Well, perhaps that’s not entirely true. I’m sure some people read every last character in those thick stacks of paper sent out by investment agencies at the end of the fiscal year. But most of us just shred them and put them in the recycling (or, unfortunately and probably more commonly, the trash). What’s in one of those things? Usually it’s just a summary of all transactions conducted by the agency on your behalf since the last report, with a few statistics thrown in for good measure. Yes, it can be useful.…

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Google Analytics Benchmarking Active

If you follow the other Google blogs such as Google Operating System or Google Blogoscoped, you’ll probably already know that Google Analytics’ Benchmarking feature is finally showing data. Heck, the Google Analytics Blog even announced this one. I thought I’d blog my take on it anyway, just to see how my opinion differs from those other people. At first glance, the benchmarking data is cool. I haven’t had a chance to probe every nook and cranny yet, but it looks like it is can be quite useful. That is, if your site fits into one of the categories provided. I…

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Google Analytics Rolling Out Benchmarking and Sharing Settings

Google Analytics makes a great way to track how your site is doing, visitor-wise, and see what content attracts the most eyeballs. If you don’t have a lot of experience in the Web analytics world, like myself (I won’t lie, I’m a n00b), you’ll probably find these upcoming features useful. What they’ll do is allow you to see how other sites in your vertical market perform. (Your “vertical market”, or “vertical”, is your field, e.g. e-commerce, blog, etc. I think. Like I said, I’m a n00b.) To get the option, those of us with higher account numbers will have to…

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Google Analytics Rolls Out New Graphing Tools and ga.js Tracking

Google Analytics just announced new graphing tools for the service. Now, apart from comparing two date ranges, users can compare different metrics to look for correlations (“Do pageviews increase as time on site goes up?”), as well as comparing individual segments with the site total. The new ga.js tracking code, which I’ve been awaiting since the announcement made in October, has also been rolled out. The new file replaces the old urchin.js script. It is completely rewritten, appears to load faster, and has new object-based methods instead of functions and variables, meaning tracking a site in multiple accounts is a…

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Google Analytics Site Search Launched

Well, I’ve got access to Site Search now in Google Analytics. It doesn’t do much right now, since people mostly get here from Google search and view about one page, but it’ll be handy for other sites I develop. Once I manage to implement search for them. Support for the AJAX Search gadget (which I have in the sidebar) is still up in the air; I’ve requested assistance on the Google Analytics Help group on Google Groups. Hopefully, it’s supported, or the Blogger team is working on supporting it; or maybe I’ll have to wait until the Analytics team adds…

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Urchin 6 Confirmed

Well, that’s what I get for blogging without first reading the entire set of new posts from Analytics Talk. That nice blogger over at EpikOne has confirmed that the new beta Urchin software is indeed the Urchin 6 update. It has a completely rewritten back-end, uses the old Analytics interface, and uses Flash graphs instead of the SVG graphics it used to (info second-hand from the post). It will cost about $3,000, and can be used with all its functionality (no more modules) for one price. Existing owners can get discounts, and users who purchased service contracts will get the…

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New Google Analytics Code

Google has released a new version of the Google Analytics JavaScript, as well, named ga.js. It replaces the old function- and variable-based calls with a new object-oriented style, and was rewritten to support event tracking. Other new features include the currently in-beta outbound link tracking and the in-rollout site search tracking. The code’s structure has changed completely, so sites using calls to urchinTracker() in multiple places (i.e. not just in the tracking code) will need to plan their upgrades so as not to leave data holes. The old urchin.js should be supported for a while, as the old Analytics reporting…

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Google Analytics Updates

Today saw some exciting announcements originally made at the eMetrics Summit in Washington, D.C. Google Analytics will be rolling out several new features in the coming weeks, including the ability to track site search (if your site has search, like this one does), tracking events in Flash and JavaScript without using urchinTracker() (which artificially increases pageviews), and Outbound Link Tracking, which will (as its name says) track outbound links. The event and outbound link tracking will first be launched as betas, meaning I might not get to use them for a while. But man, that last one’s going to be…

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Google’s Quietness About Releases

Since Google bought the Urchin company in 2005, and since then has been extremely quiet about the upgrade Urchin promised in late 2004. The Urchin 6 upgrade has never been released, though the Google Analytics website says, “Urchin 6 software will not be free when it is released.” It goes on to say that customers who purchased extended service contracts that have expired will be offered a free upgrade, though there is no indication at all of the product’s release date, now approximately three years overdue. Current customers are getting antsy about Google’s keeping mum, and it certainly would worry…

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